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Vote for BRLSI Youth Activities to receive a Community Award

You can help the BRLSI's Youth Activities to receive up to £5,00o worth of funding with just a few clicks. 

How do machines see?

On Friday 25 April 2014 at 7.30 pm, Professor Roy Davies of Royal Holloway University of London will speak in the Science group series on “Computer Vision: What Goes on ‘Under the Bonnet’ ”.

Crimean Relics revisited?

With the Crimean peninsula in the news every day, it has been difficult for us not to think of an earlier Crimean conflict: the Crimean War of 1854–1856. 

‘Curious Corners’ app brings BRLSI's and No.1 Royal Crescent’s ‘Cabinet of Curiosities’ to life

A group of final year students from Bath Spa University teamed up with BRLSI and No.1 Royal Crescent to create an iPad app using objects on loan from the BRLSI Collection.  

What exactly is Energy?

On Friday March 28th at 7.30 pm Professor John Davies of the University of Bath will give the first talk (aimed at non-specialists) in the forthcoming Science Group series on Energy.

 

 

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Judith Ann Mcdermott

This is going to look amazing once you've completed the job. It will definitely be worth the long slow process. Are you going to keep us up to date...

Denise Scurrah (Cusick)

Another fascinating look at just some of the artefacts from the collections. Hope the exhibition is a huge success. Just a little too far for me to...

Denise Scurrah (Cusick)

Hello, I am interested in joining the psychology and anthropology group. Could you please tell me how to join?. I am 30 years old. Is there much...

lucy Hayward

Did you know...

Wine seller.

In our original building, next to Parade Gardens, the vaults were rented out to a wine merchant.

Curatorial Curiosities

Mammoth Milk Molar

This milk tooth from a Wooley Mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) was found in Wookey Hole, Somerset. The mamoth, like its close relatives the extant elephants, had four molars. As the front pair wore down and droped out in pieces, the back pair shifted forward, with two new molars emerging in the back of the mouth. Elephants replace their teeth six times.